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Alternatives to Safe Fonts in PowerPoint

Learn about alternatives to safe fonts in PowerPoint.


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We learned about using safe fonts in PowerPoint, especially if you want to share your slides with others who may not have the required fonts. In simple terms, this means using fonts such as Calibri, Arial, or Times New Roman in your slides so that almost anyone can see the slides identically -- as you see them! Sometimes, this may not be a bad idea, but you do have to narrow down your choices to the bare basics. Fortunately, there are some alternatives to safe fonts too -- and some of these may work for you. The best part is that you may be able to show your slides with the fonts that you like!

Do note that these ideas may not be suitable for use in every scenario. However, do explore these four options:

1. Embed Fonts

Embed Fonts
Figure 1: Embed Fonts

Yes, PowerPoint does allow limited font embedding: font licensing issues may not allow all fonts to be embedded. Further, only TrueType fonts can be embedded, and even with all those limitations, embedded fonts will not work in PowerPoint for Mac, or even tablet and phone platforms. To learn how you can embed fonts, look at our Embed Fonts in PowerPoint page.

2. Convert Fonts to Shapes

Convert Fonts to Shapes
Figure 1: Convert Fonts to Shapes

Yes, this only works in the newest versions of PowerPoint but is best suited for some text. You ideally don’t want all the text in your slides to be converted to text because the text will no longer be editable. Plus none of the text animations will work with shape text. To convert text into shapes, look at our Converting PowerPoint Text to Shapes page.

3. Save to PDF of Flat File

Save to PDF of Flat File
Figure 1: Save to PDF of Flat File

Save your presentation as a PDF, or even flatten all slides to create a PowerPoint Picture Presentation, a special PowerPoint file type that creates flat images from all your slides, and then replaces the slides themselves with the flat image.

4. Send a Font Link

Send a Font Link
Figure 1: Send a Font Link

Send your recipient a link from where they can download the font. This approach works best in two scenarios: when you use a public domain or free font; or when your company uses a proprietary font that can be shared. In some scenarios, you can also send a link to a site that charges for a license to use a font. Also, if you have a multiple user license for a font, you can share it with others, especially your design agency -- however, each site or font foundry has different licensing options, so make sure you double-check before sending a font to someone else.

As you can see, all approaches will not work all the time. However, if you combine these approaches, you can certainly overcome font limitations. And you can always use safe fonts in PowerPoint if these approaches don’t work for you.

PowerPoint Keyboard Shortcuts

PowerPoint Keyboard Shortcuts and Sequences:
PowerPoint 2016, 2013, 2011, 2010, 2007 and 2003 for Windows
PowerPoint 2016 and 2011 for Mac

Have your ever used keyboard shortcuts and sequences in PowerPoint? Or are you a complete keyboard aficionado? Do you want to learn about some new shortcuts? Or do you want to know if your favorite keyboard shortcuts are documented?

Go and get a copy of our PowerPoint Keyboard Shortcuts and Sequences ebook.



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