by Geetesh Bajaj, January 17th 2012
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Simple, Spartan, and Successful

Geetesh Bajaj
The power of simplicity pervades everywhere -- and is the key to conceptualizing, creating, and delivering any type of presentation. The need to weed out the unrequired, the aim to keep things as uncomplicated as we can, and to clearly understand what the audience wants -- these are all objectives that any presenter will associate with. And the best way to attain these objectives is with simplicity.
Simplicity has a friend whose name is Spartan. They often work best when they are working together -- and that's the reason why presentations that are simple and spartan are successful as well. Let us all spend the next few days implementing these thoughts.
We continue with plenty of new content in this issue -- scroll down to find more.
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Animated Slide: Cube Perspective

Animated Slide: Cube PerspectiveThis slide uses several squares that were applied 3D styles to end up as cubes. Each cube is of a different size, is rotated at a different angle, and also uses Theme colors – so if you add this slide to another presentation, the cubes will sport colors coordinated with your presentation. Each cube has more than one animation added so that it diminishes in size as it moves to an imaginary perspective point located off the top right part of the slide. All animations are set to repeat indefinitely so that the cubes keep moving until you navigate to the next slide.

Download and use this slide in your presentation.

PowerPoint Add-in Review: Chart Advisor

Chart Advisor Add-in ReviewHave you ever wondered if the typical column chart you use all the time is the best way to present your data? Or should you explore the other variations for column charts? Maybe, you should use a stacked area chart to show some data in a better way? There are so many questions -- and answers to most of them would be on the lines of "Great, but first I need to see what these charts look like with my data!" That's a perfectly valid reasoning -- and Chart Advisor, our review product can be just what you need -- unfortunately, it has two big disadvantages that we will explore soon after we introduce you to the product!

Learn how Chart Advisor can help you explore and choose from different chart types suitable for your data.

Conversations and Interviews

Kevin LernerSpeaking about Speaking: Toastmasters International - by Kevin Lerner

Every Friday precisely at noon from a small dining room in the back of Duffey's sports bar in Boynton Beach Florida, someone bangs the gavel five times. To the group of 30 men and women that have gathered for the weekly luncheon meeting of the Bill Gove Golden Gavel Toastmasters Club, it's a signal to get down to the business of speaking. For the next 60 minutes, the members will learn, laugh, and work toward the common goal of Toastmasters International: improve communications and leadership skills. Founded in 1924, Toastmasters International has helped over 4 million people to become more confident speakers and leaders. Today, over 270,000 Toastmaster members improve their speaking and leadership skills by attending one of the 13,000 clubs that make up the global network of meeting locations. Read more in this post by Kevin Lerner.


Claudyne WilderAdd Value to Your Slide: by Claudyne Wilder
A typical PowerPoint presentation includes the speaker reading the slide and maybe including a couple of other sentences that are not on the slide. That is backwards. This upside-down pyramid shows how conveying the data itself is one small piece –- and perhaps the smallest -– of your presentation. Your task as a speaker is to communicate information that is not on the slide. Let’s start at the bottom of the inverted pyramid. Read the conversation here.
Communication Job Pyramid

Learn PowerPoint 2010: Proofing

Learn PowerPoint 2011 for Mac: Action Buttons

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End Note

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