Home | Articles

Coaching Tips for Powerful Presentations

Author: Sandra Schrift

Date Created: July 12th 2007
Last Updated: June 14th 2012

Sandra Schrift Sandra Schrift is a speaker bureau owner and now career coach to emerging and veteran public speakers who want to "grow" a profitable speaking business. She also works with business professionals and organizations who want to master their presentations.

Visit her site to find out how you can make it as a professional speaker






Tip #1

The purpose of your speech is to get results; to help people make changes and think or act differently. So start with the end in mind. What do you want people to do as a result of your speech? What do they need to know to do this? What do they need to feel to do this?

Tip #2

Show your audience that coaching is a process. It is different from consulting. Do some coaching (role playing) during your presentation. Let audience members see what it would be like to have you as their coach.

Tip #3

Determine what kind of coaching the client wants and needs. Interview a few people before you give your program to find out what challenges they are experiencing. The program chair can provide you with a few names to contact.
Then use this information in your speech content.

Tip #4

People learn in three ways: Visual (what they can see), Auditory (what they can hear), and Kinesthetic (what they can touch). Try to include all three ways in your speech. Most of your audience will be visual and need to "see" what they "hear" from you. So tell your personal stories to support your points. When the audience hears your story(ies) they will feel connected to you.

Tip #5

People have short attention spans. Review your main points before you end your speech. Don't give them too much information. Most people only remember one or two concepts - so provide your best one or two ideas that will have the most significance to that particular audience.

Tip #6

Be conversational by engaging the audience. Don't lecture the audience. Adults love to learn but don't like to think they are in school. Be interactive. Remember, the audience that gets involved with your material will learn something they can use immediately. A great speaker wants the audience to "own" his/her material.

Tip #7

Use humor. This keeps the audience interested and they learn better.
I don't mean telling jokes. Use deprecating humor or make comments on common every day events, you know, the human condition. Bill Cosby is great at this. Think of others who do this well and emulate their style.

Tip #8

Use strong openings. Examples: a story, a significant statement, a quotation, a challenging question. You really only have 60 seconds to connect with your audience. Then you must provide a speech that engages them. Using personal stories and sprinkling your remarks with humor will keep them interested

Tip #9

Use Strong Closings. Examples: Provide a summary. (Tell 'em what you told them) Review the main points, make a statement, tell an anecdote. Finally challenge them to take some action . . . immediately, in the next 48 hours, in one week, by the end of the year.

Tip #10

Use an evaluation form. This will provide you with feedback to grow and make course corrections as needed. Keep it short and always ask, "Who else would benefit from this program?" "May I call you to get this information?"

Back


comments powered by Disqus




Subscribe to Indezine
Follow Indezine

Follow Indezine on Pinterest
Share This Page
Bookmark and Share
Translate Page


Like This Page
Like This Site



Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Home | PowerPoint | Photoshop | PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Tutorials | Blog | Notes | Ezine | Advertise | Feedback | Site Map | About Us | Contact Us

Link to Us | Privacy | Testimonials

PowerPoint Backgrounds | Christian PowerPoint Backgrounds | Business PowerPoint Presentation Templates

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

©2000-2016, Geetesh Bajaj. All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000